Bishop’s Commissions

Council for LiturgyEcumenismJustice & Peace CommissionAssembly Committee

The Council for Liturgy will work with the Bishop towards fulfilment of the Church's earnest desire "that all the faithful should be led to that full, conscious and active participation in liturgical celebration which is demanded by the very nature of the liturgy, and to which the Christian people, 'a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a redeemed people' (1 Peter 2:9, 4-5) have a right and obligation by reason of their baptism".

Membership

  • Bishop Ralph Heskett (Chairman)
  • Rev Peter D McGuire (Secretary)

Contact

Rev Peter D McGuire, 28 College Road, Spinkhill, Sheffield. S21 3YB

Telephone: 0124 643 2289

Email: peter@pdmcguire.com

The Diocesan Contact for Interfaith and Ecumenism is Reverend Andrew Crowley.

Ecumenism

If Anglicans and Catholics see that both are not there for themselves, but are rather instruments of Christ, ‘friends of the Bridegroom’ as St John says; if both follow tegether the priority of Christ and not themselves, they draw closer together, because the priority of Christ brings them together, they are no longer in competition, each one seeking greater numbers, but are united in commitment to the truth of Christ. (Pope Benedict, in flight 16 September 2010)

Churches Together in Britain & Ireland

Churches Together in South Yorkshire (Joint Presidents: Rev Gill Newton, Chairman of the Sheffield Methodist District, Bishop of Sheffield, Rt Rev Ralph Heskett CSsR, Bishop of Hallam)

More local ‘Churches Together’ Groups exist throughout South Yorkshire

Sheffield North Deanery Mission & Unity (Contact Fr Shaun Smith)

World Faiths

Guidance on Visiting Other Religious Centres and Places of Worship

The following Guidance is given to assist those who are invited to attend religious centres and /or places of worship of other religions.  The Diocese of Hallam Guidelines are drafted in conformity with Guidance given by the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales which is contained in the booklet ‘Meeting God in Friend and Stranger’.  The full text of this is available at http://www.cbcew.org.uk/CBCEW-Home/Departments/Dialogue-and-Unity/Other-Religions/Bishops-Document

The context of this document and our Guidelines is that we live in a society made up of people of many different faiths and, when we are invited to attend religious centres or places of worship we should show respect for their different cultures and ways of worship. We should always be aware that our faith guides us to Christ as the unique pathway to God and guides us as to how we are to learn about and co-operate with people of other religions.

 

Visiting a Vihara (Buddhist)

  • Visitors should remove their shoes before entering the shrine room.
  • Visitors will usually sit on the floor.
  • Some Buddhist monks are not allowed to touch women and do not shake hands. They will prefer to put their hands together in the traditional Eastern manner of greeting.

Visiting a Church Building (Christian)

  • Male visitors should remove their hats when entering a church building
  • Certain parts of the church, such as the altar area, may not be open to explore. This must be clarified with the host community before the visit begins.
  • Some churches have a burial ground next to them. The gravestones can themselves provide a fascinating insight into people’s beliefs about life, death and the afterlife.
  • The amount of decoration and ornament in a church building will reflect the particular tradition and its beliefs. For example, Roman Catholic churches are generally highly decorated (statues, lamps and candles, stations of the cross etc) whilst buildings used by members of the Free Churches (such as Baptists) are relatively plain.
  • As in all places of worship, maintain a respectful attitude when visiting or invited to prayers. Do not take pictures without asking permission.

Visiting a Mandir (Hindu)

  • All visitors will have to remove their shoes and place them in the shoe racks provided.
  • Head covering is not normally required.
  • It is important to be respectful and this means that backs should not be turned on the murtis(images of the deities) or the soles of the feet pointed towards them when sitting on the carpet.
  • Prashad– a gift of fruit, nuts and other food – is often given to visitors as they leave.
  • Visitors usually sit on the carpeted floor.
  • Sometimes, the priest will offer to place a red mark (tilak) on the forehead of those who want this.

Visiting a Synagogue (Jewish)

  • All males have to cover their heads. Often synagogues have a supply of kippot (skull caps) to use. Jewish married women wear headscarves or a hat when in an Orthodox synagogu This won’t be needed in a Reform or Progressive synagogue.
  • In Orthodox synagogues, men and women sit in separate areas for worship.

Visiting a Mosque (Muslim)

  • All visitors will have to remove their shoes and place them in the shoe-racks provided.
  • During prayer time, male visitors may be required to cover their heads. Females may need to wear a headscarf.
  • Given the Muslim emphasis on modesty, clothing should cover arms and legs.
  • Male and female visitors may have to sit separately, but this is unlikely during an educational visit.
  • Visitors should avoid sitting with the soles of their feet pointing towards the mihrab(prayer niche at the front of the prayer hall).

Visiting a Gurdwara (Sikh)

  • All visitors will have to remove their shoes and place them in the shoe racks provided.
  • All visitors will need to cover their heads. Head coverings will be available in the Gurdwara but a knotted handkerchief is acceptable. Other hats (eg baseball-style caps) are not appropriate.
  • Few chairs are available and so, when sitting, this will be on the carpeted floor.
  • On first entering the large prayer room, a small bow to the Guru Granth Sahib (the holy book) shows respect to the host community. Backs should not be turned on the Guru Granth Sahib or the soles of the feet pointed towards the book when sitting on the carpet.
  • Visitors are usually offered kara parshad (sweet food offered as a gift) in the worship hall, which is usually given in cupped hands and eaten with the right hand.
  • Visitors will be usually given Langar (vegetarian food from the communal kitchen).

 

The Justice & Peace Commission exists to:

  • Inform itself of what the Gospels and teaching of the Church call for in matters of Justice & Peace
  • To inform itself of injustice locally, nationally, globally and in the Church
  • To encourage others to become increasingly aware of the Gospel imperatives and injustices that call for remedy
  • To work for and to promote work for justice and peace locally, nationally and globally
  • To support those suffering oppression and to do whatever the Commission can do to assist them to throw off oppression
  • To uphold the integrity of creation

Membership

Bishop Ralph (President), Helen Donlan (Chair), Tony Singleton (Secretary), Fr Shaun Smith (Treasurer), Sheena Field, Louise Finnigan, Anne Peacey (NJPN), Mary Platts, Angela Powell (CAFOD), Kathleen Walley, Rodrigo Edema, Liam Harron, Deacon Chris Kime, Dominik Kocbuch, Greg Ryan (Adult Formation)

Contact

Helen Donlan (Chair of the J&P Commission)

Email: helen.donlan@btinternet.com

Rev Shaun Smith, Sacred Heart Presbytery, 479 Langsett Rd, Sheffield S6 2LN

Tel: 0114 234 3580

Email: sacredheart479@btinternet.com

DIOCESAN ASSEMBLIES

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